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Modalities offered by Elementals Massage

Elementals Massage offers Restorative Massage, a unique blend of any or all of the modalities outlined below.
Each session is customized for you, based on your therapist’s intuition, the response of your tissue and, of course your preferences.
Our goal is to make every session exactly what you need so you can feel restored and balanced

Sacro Wedgy ®

The Sacro Wedgy® is a device that isolates and elevates the sacrum (your tail-bone) and uses gravity help relax, aligned and re-balance the body from the hips out.  What we have learned is that we’re basically creatures of balance—chemical, emotional and physical. All we’re doing is offering a tool and a system to use to help achieve better muscle balance. It’s amazing what goes away when we’re “balanced” and “relaxed.”

There is a triangular shaped muscle called the piriformis.  The wide end of the triangle attaches to the front of the sacrum and the narrow end attaches to the hip. This muscle is also thought to be the beginning of a series of misalignments or what we call a “snowball” effect.  The sciatic nerve is also involved with this muscle so you can understand how this has helped so many with sciatica.  As gravity takes over and the hips relax, the piriformis has a chance to stretch a little, and relieve some of the sciatic symptoms.  For some people, this is going to hurt like the devil so they have to relax even more. This is where the therapist protocol can help.

For more information on this product, please go to their website:  www.sacrowedgy.com.

CranioSacral Therapy

CranioSacral Therapy (CST) was pioneered and developed by osteopathic physician John E. Upledger following extensive scientific studies from 1975 to 1983 at Michigan State University, where he served as a clinical researcher and Professor of Biomechanics.

CST is a gentle, hands-on method of evaluating and enhancing the functioning of a physiological body system called the craniosacral system – comprised of the membranes and cerebrospinal fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord.

Using a soft touch generally no greater than 5 grams, or about the weight of a nickel, practitioners release restrictions in the craniosacral system to improve the functioning of the central nervous system.

By complementing the body’s natural healing processes, CST is increasingly used as a preventive health measure for its ability to bolster resistance to disease, and is effective for a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction, including:
Migraine Headaches
Chronic Neck and Back Pain
Motor-Coordination Impairments
Colic
Autism
Central Nervous System Disorders
Orthopedic Problems
Traumatic Brain and Spinal Cord Injuries
Scoliosis
Infantile Disorders
Learning Disabilities
Chronic Fatigue
Emotional Difficulties
Stress and Tension-Related Problems
Fibromyalgia and other Connective-Tissue Disorders
Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome (TMJ)
Neurovascular or Immune Disorders
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Post-Surgical Dysfunction

Swedish Massage

Swedish massage is the most common and best-known type of massage in the West. If it’s your first time receiving massage or you don’t get massage very often, Swedish massage is the perfect massage for you.

A Swedish massage can be slow and gentle, or vigorous and bracing, depending on the therapist’s personal style and what he or she wants to achieve.

Swedish massage is based on the Western concepts of anatomy and physiology, as opposed to energy work on “meridians” or sen lines in Asian massage systems. Most people get a 60-minute massage, but 90-minutes gives the therapist more time to work the muscle tissue and achieve results.

What Happens During A Swedish Massage

In all Swedish massage, the therapist lubricates the skin with massage oil and performs various massage strokes. These movements warm up the muscle tissue, releasing tension and gradually breaking up muscle “knots” or adhered tissues, called adhesions. Swedish massage promotes relaxation, among other health benefits.

Before the massage, the therapist should ask you about any injuries or other conditions that he or she should know about. Things you would want tell a therapist include areas of tightness or pain, allergies, and conditions like pregnancy. You can also tell them up front if you have a preference for light or firm pressure. If you are ill you will not be able to get a massage until you are well once again. The massage can increase the severity of your symptoms. It can also put your therapist at a significant risk of infection

After the consultation, the therapist instructs you how to lie on the table — face up or face down, and underneath the sheet — and then leaves the room. He or she will knock or ask if you are ready before entering.

The Nudity Factor

During a Swedish massage you we generally be disrobed to your comfort level under a sheet. The therapist uncovers only the part of the body she is working on, a technique called draping. If the nudity gets you out of your comfort zone, you can keep your underwear on, and many newcomers do.

You usually start by laying face up. The therapist generally starts by works your scalp, neck and shoulders, using various massage strokes that include effleurage, kneading, friction, stretching and tapping.

When she’s finished with this area she will massage your arms and the front of your legs. When done with the back side, she holds the sheet up and looks away while you turn over onto your stomach and scoot up; then she quickly covers you again. The therapist then massages the back of each leg, hips ,back and generally finishes with your feet..

Some therapists work in a different order, and all have their own style and techniques. If you only have 60 minutes, you can also ask them to spend more time on a certain area. If the pressure is too light or too firm, you should speak up and ask the therapist to adjust it. Swedish massage usually includes some deeper work on areas of specific muscle tension.

Why It’s Called Swedish Massage

Swedish massage is based on the Western concepts of anatomy and physiology as. Both Swedish massage and physical therapy were pioneered by a Swedish physiologist, Per Henrik Ling (1776-1839)at the University of Stockholm.

In the early 19th century he developed a system called “Medical Gymnastics” which included movements performed by a therapist. These became the known as “Swedish movements” in Europe and “the Swedish Movement Cure” when they came to the U.S. in 1858. Today it is simply known as Swedish massage.

Swedish massage is the foundation for other types of Western massage, including sports massage, deep tissue massage and aromatherapy massage.

Firm Pressure/Deep Tissue Massage

What is deep tissue massage and how does it differ from deep/firm pressure massage

A deep or firm pressure massage is simply a Swedish massage using more aggressive pressure. This technique can still be applied as a full body treatment.

Deep tissue massage is a type of massage therapy that focuses on realigning deeper layers of muscles and connective tissue. Deep tissue targets specific issues or areas.

It is especially helpful for chronically tense and contracted areas such as stiff necks, low back tightness, and sore shoulders.

Deep tissue can utilize firm pressure, but not necessarily. In fact such modalities such as CranioSacral Therapy use as little as 5 grams of pressure to effect tissue as deep as the dural tube surrounding the spinal cord. Deep tissue massage is rarely used as a full body treatment.

How does deep tissue massage work?

When there is chronic muscle tension or injury, there are usually adhesions (bands of painful, rigid tissue) in muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Adhesions can block circulation and cause pain, limited movement, and inflammation.

Deep tissue massage works by physically breaking down these adhesions to relieve pain and restore normal movement. To do this, the massage therapist often uses direct deep pressure or friction applied across the grain of the muscles.

Will deep tissue massage hurt?

At certain points during the massage, some people find there is usually some discomfort and pain.

It is important to tell the massage therapist when things hurt and if any soreness or pain you experience is outside your comfort range.

There can be some stiffness or pain after a deep tissue massage, but it should subside within a day or so. The massage therapist may recommend applying ice to the area after the massage.

What conditions is deep tissue massage used for?

Unlike classic massage therapy, which is used for relaxation, deep tissue massage usually focuses on a specific problem, such as:

Chronic pain
Limited mobility
Recovery from injuries (e.g. whiplash, falls, sports injury)
Repetitive strain injury, such as carpal tunnel syndrome
Postural problems
Osteoarthritis pain
Fibromyalgia
Muscle tension or spasm

Deep tissue massage also received a top ranking for fibromyalgia pain.

People often notice improved range of motion immediately after a deep tissue massage.

What can I expect during my visit?

Massage therapists may use fingertips, knuckles, hands, elbows, and forearms during the deep tissue massage.

You may be asked to breathe deeply as the massage therapist works on certain tense areas.
It is important to drink plenty of water as you can after the massage to flush metabolic waste from the tissues.

Assisted Stretching

Based on Active Isolated Stretching (AIS), developed by Aaron L. Mattes, MS., R.K.T., L.M.T., of Sarasota, Florida, is a gentle method of stretching specific (isolated) muscles while requiring the active participation of the person being stretched.

Performing an Active Isolated Stretch of no longer than two seconds allows the target muscles to optimally lengthen without triggering the protective stretch reflex and subsequent reciprocal antagonistic muscle contraction as the isolated muscle achieves a state of relaxation. These stretches provide maximum benefit and can be accomplished without opposing tension or resulting trauma.

Myofascial Release

Myofascial release is a manual therapy technique often used in massage. The technique focuses on pain believed to arise from myofascial tissues — the tough membranes that wrap, connect and support your muscles.
Theoretically, myofascial pain differs from other types of pain because it originates in “trigger points,” which are related to stiff, anchored areas within the myofascia. The pain that a trigger point causes is often difficult to localize, though.

During myofascial release therapy, the therapist locates myofascial areas that feel stiff and fixed instead of elastic and movable under light manual pressure. These areas, though not always near what feels like the source of pain, are thought to restrict muscle and joint movements, contributing to widespread muscle pain. The focused manual pressure and stretching used in myofascial release therapy loosen or release these areas of restriction.

 

Neuromuscular Therapy

The most effective type of massage therapy for lower back pain is neuromuscular therapy. Neuromuscular therapy is also called trigger point myotherapy. The American Academy of Pain Management recognizes this form of massage therapy as an effective treatment for back pain caused by soft tissue injury (such as a muscle strain).

Neuromuscular Massage Therapy Technique

Neuromuscular therapy consists of alternating levels of concentrated pressure on the areas of muscle spasm. The massage therapy pressure is usually applied with the fingers, knuckles, or elbow. Once applied to a muscle spasm, the pressure should not vary for ten to thirty seconds.

Muscles that are in spasm will be painful to the touch. The pain is caused by ischemic muscle tissue. Ischemia means the muscle is lacking proper blood flow, usually due to the muscle spasm. This in turn creates the following undesirable process:

Because the muscle is not receiving enough blood, the muscle is also not receiving enough oxygen
The lack of oxygen causes the muscle to produce lactic acid
The lactic acid makes the muscle feel sore following physical activity.
After the muscle is relaxed through massage therapy, the lactic acid will be released from the muscle, and the muscle should start receiving enough blood and oxygen.

Neuromuscular therapy will feel painful at first, but the pressure of the massage should alleviate the muscle spasm. At this point, it is extremely important to communicate with the massage therapist regarding the pressure – whether the pressure is too much, too little, getting better, getting worse. The therapist should listen and respond accordingly. The massage therapy pressure should never be overly painful. In fact, most people describe the pressure as “good pain”.

Following a neuromuscular therapy massage, any soreness that presents itself should fade after twenty-four to thirty-six hours. The muscles that were tight should remain noticeably more relaxed for four to fourteen days, depending on stress

Reiki

Reiki is a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing. It is administered by “laying on hands” and is based on the idea that an unseen “life force energy” flows through us and is what causes us to be alive. If one’s “life force energy” is low, then we are more likely to get sick or feel stress, and if it is high, we are more capable of being happy and healthy.

The word Reiki is made of two Japanese words – Rei which means “Divine or Universal” and Ki which is “life force energy”. So Reiki is actually “universal life force energy.”

A treatment feels like a wonderful glowing radiance that flows through and around you. Reiki treats the whole person including body, emotions, mind and spirit creating many beneficial effects that include relaxation and feelings of peace, security and wellbeing.

Reiki is a simple, natural and safe method of spiritual healing and self-improvement that everyone can use. It has been effective in helping virtually every known illness and malady and always creates a beneficial effect. It also works in conjunction with all other medical or therapeutic techniques to relieve side effects and promote recovery

Chakra Balancing

Chakras are energy centers in the human body; each corresponds to different glands and governs specific parts of the physical body and areas of the psyche.

Chakras are located deep within the center of the physical body next to a hormonal gland along the spinal column.

Chakras draw in the divine life-force energy from the universe and distribute this vital energy to the physical glands and organs throughout the body and bloodstream specific to obtaining optimum health and well being.

Chakras are considered to be interrelated and affect one another, therefore achieving optimum balance of these Chakras provides a state of total well being emotionally and physically. Often Chakras are thought to be influenced by negative thoughts that also negatively affect the chakras’ ability to function correctly leading them to become dirty, shrunken, or swollen.